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    1 of 9
    John St John
    4 years ago
    Background: The other day, I read an article about why drivers don’t “see” motorcyles/motorcyclists. It explained that research has shown that the brain filters out information from the eyes; and that prior experience and an evolutionary adaptation (of sorts) causes the brain to disregard or downplay the visual data the motorcyclist provides to a percieved status of “ non-threatening”. Indeed, not very threatening to the driver of the SUV, but very much so to the motorcyclist.



    Musings:  Perhaps the brain of the motorist could be tricked into seeing a motorcyclist as a threat. What would it take to do this? Maybe, headlights could be equipped to project a holographic image of a T-Rex or Mac truck. Perhaps, certain wavelengths or subliminal messages could awaken fear for the other person on the motorcycle. I assume, in the past such efforts to make motorcyclists safer have focused on the eyes, when the problem is really in the brain. Thoughts, suggestions, ....anyone? 
    2 of 9
    Yermo
    4 years ago
    I'm not sure what could be perceived as "threatening" except running in large groups of bikes.

    As a lone rider, I suspect there's little one can do to project a "threat". Any electronic aid would, after repeat exposure much like a deer whistle, lose it's effectiveness, I would think.

    I find myself thinking that humans detect odd motions as "threatening". Driving lights do help with depth perception. I wonder if some driving lights that move erratically might register? 
    3 of 9
    DigitalRodney
    4 years ago
    So are you thinking like the lights on a train that sweep back and forth? I know lots of riders swear by the modulators that flash headlights.
    On another bike I had a set of LED's that would flash three times, then stay on, and I had a lot of riders say that caught their attention.
    4 of 9
    buffalo
    4 years ago
    In theory, things that flash irregularly or "move" or do something to stand out from the background of just straight steady lighting, *should* help with visibility...
    5 of 9
    John St John
    4 years ago
    I installed a Kisan Electronics P75W light modulator in the positive feed to the LED auxiliary lights on my R1200GS. $59.26 with shipping. Easy install, works as hoped. Note: the bike is off in the video, lights are running on CanBus 1-minute delayed shutoff.


    Link to short video: 
    Video #11583
    John St John
    4 years ago

    IMG 9903

    Short clip of auxiliary lights modulated with Kisan Electronics P75W. Easy install in positive feed to lights. Cost $59.26, with shipping.
    6 of 9
    Yermo
    4 years ago
    Yea, I'm afraid uploading videos to the site doesn't work. Only still photos. Upload to youtube then paste a link to the video here.
    7 of 9
    John St John
    4 years ago
    An unintended, but not unwelcome, consequence of using the light modulator is a big increase in the number of cars and trucks that pull off to the shoulder to let me pass. Today, there were so many that I felt a little guilty (pleasure) about it, and turned them off, for a little while.
    8 of 9
    Yermo
    4 years ago
    Oh that's cool. I wonder if they mistook you for law enforcement?
    9 of 9
    Ian
    4 years ago
    I like that accessory light modulator more than the headlight modulators that I've seen.  In general, blinky lights annoy me, so I appreciate that those are not no the primary light.  I could see how people might be confused and think they should pull to the side to let you pass.  If it's legal, then enjoy and rock on!

    I swear by my yellow helmet.  It's up high and central, and it doesn't blend into a cloudy sky like a white helmet.  Wearing a hi-viz jacket would help even more, but I like my old cowhide jacket too much to give it up just yet.
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